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it s a humanities essay

We need to choose a book and talk about it. The book That i choose is <1984> . Please follow the requirement ,and thank you for your help

Final Essay Assignment

Due Date: Week 12, Dec 4 – 7, in your Active Learning Classroom

Length: Four pages, double spaced, 1” margins, 12 pt font

Upload your essay into the Final Essay assignment folder. No hard copy required.

Write an essay on the style of your book. The criteria from the Elements of Style listed below will

be your main guide. Include in your discussion TWO criteria from the list, as follows

— The tone of the composition as a whole (A)

— One other element (B to F) of your choice.

Discuss how the second (stylistic element B-F) relates to the first (the tone of the composition). Usone other scholarly source or resource in your essay.

Elements of Style

A. The Tone of the Composition as a Whole (mandatory)

B. Paragraph Development

C. Sentence Structure

D. Sentence Rhythm

E. Diction

F. Punctuation

The Tone of the Composition as a Whole

This list represents an array of possible tones in a work. Choose one tone for your discussion. If

you don’t choose from this list, speak with your instructor about an alternative.

1. Flexible – the author is not bound by the conventions of writing; she is free to explore all

avenues.

2. Varied – the author chooses more than one kind of style to make her point – these may be used

for purposes of comparison or contrast or for purposes of emphasis.

3. Rigid, mannered – one style is maintained throughout the composition perhaps to convey a sense of completeness, or to restrict thought to that convention.

4. Conventional – adheres to the rules of general usage and conforms to established practices. 5. Traditional – customs are based on time-honoured practices.

6. Individual – has characteristics which relate to the personality of the author or one of her

characters.

7. Original – unprecedented practices created by the author.

8. Fresh – a new outlook on an established idea.

9. Tense – the overall tone of the passage is strained or suspenseful.

10. Relaxed – conveys an effortless atmosphere in a loose, less formal manner.

11. Simple – portrays characters or ideas candidly with few chances for misunderstanding.

12. Complex – the subject is many-faceted, with figures of speech, longer sentences, use of

analogies, etc.

13. Literal – communicates on one level, a primary meaning, concerned with facts; exaggerates or

embellishes very little.

14. Figurative – makes use of figures of speech, metaphorical, or literary devices.

15. Direct – straightforward, candid, frank, does not deviate.

16. Involved – takes an in-depth look at the subject, exploring feelings and behaviours at length;

patient and pain-staking in its developments.

17. Abstract – favours the theoretical over the concrete; deals in abstractions, concepts.

18. Concrete – relies heavily on specific facts and instances to flesh out ideas.

19. Ponderous – heavy and dull

20. Epigrammatic – containing wise sayings smartly expressed

21. Didactic – instructive (teaching)

22. Dogmatic – positive, assertive

23. Colloquial – using the vernacular (common speech)

24. Pompous – pretentious, affecting a false dignity

25. Gushing – without reserve, usually without reflection

26. Coy – a pretense of bashfulness 27. Ironical – the use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning

28. Humorous – funny, laughable, comical

29. Gay – merry, cheerful, jolly

30. Solemn – deeply earnest, serious, grave

31. Wistful – pensive, wishful

33. Romantic – extravagantly emotional, idealistic

34. Religious – conscientious devotion to topic

35. Serious – sober, earnest, sincere

36. Melancholy – thoughtfully sad

37. Sad – sorrowful, unhappy, dispirited

38. Whimsical – oddly funny

39. Reminiscent – things remembered

40. Sentimental – cloying or overdone in its emotions

41. Pensive – musing, thoughtful

42. Reverent – showing respect

43. Sportive – mischievous

44. Reflective – thoughtful

45. Somber – gloomy

46. Sinister – boding evil

47. Nostalgic – longing for home or country, or for something that is absent

Paragraph Development

The development of paragraphs within a composition is dependent on the author’s depiction of her

topic. Paragraphs may be developed:

1. Sequentially – organized by steps or through time

2. Spatially – organized through distance or space 3. Logically – reasoning from one supposition to another

4. Systematically – according to a method

5. Haphazardly – to convey a sense of confusion

C. Sentence Structure

Clues to an author’s style may rest in the structure of her sentences.

1. Short – giving a staccato effect for excitement or speed.

2. Long – characterizes formal styles, especially discussions of ideas, also common in fiction (i.e.,

descriptive passages).

3. Varied in length – figures of speech may be used in order to embellish ideas.

4. Loose – makes sense if brought to a close at one or more points before the end.

5. Periodic – makes complete sense only when one reaches the end (or period). This may add to

suspense or variety.

6. Parallel – two or more parts of a sentence follow the same grammatical construction. Use for

emphasis.

7. Balance, antithesis, inversion, repetition and subordinate construction adds emphasis to ideas

discussed in passage.

8. Simple and compound sentences lend simplistic tone and style, subject is not meant to be

portrayed in a complex manner

9. Complex sentences may help to convey a conflict of ideas.

10. Logical connectives between sentences solidify the argument.

11. Rhetorical questions – used to make the reader supply additional material for the passage, and to motivate reader to consider implications of passage.

D. Sentence Rhythm

An author’s style may be enhanced by the rhythm of her sentences. This rhythm can convey a sense of regularity or an evolving process; it may be achieved through length, repetition, symmetry,

parallelism; look for clues in punctuation.

E. Diction

Examine the words in the composition. They may be:

1. Monosyllabic – one syllable – this style may be used to effect simplicity or it may be used for the purposes of austerity.

2. Polysyllabic – two or more syllables – a more formal, serious style which may make use of

any of the constructions mentioned previously.

3. Archaic – belonging to ancient times – in this case, the style is obviously meant to transport

the reader into a different era.

4. Connotative – suggesting more than the plain meaning – a figurative style meant to be

emotive or reflective.

Other words to consider when analyzing the style based on a study of the words in a passage are: 1. Rare words – the intent may be lofty, lighthearted, informative or comparative.

2. Technical and scientific words – serious writing with a referential intent.

3. Slang and colloquialisms – may be used for humour or for realism.

4. Abstractions – intended to make reader reflect or accept alternate ideas.

5. Dialect words – used to portray a definite group of people, to convey realistic flavour.

6. Allusions – formal writing; the author supposes readers can make comparative judgements.

7. Onomatopoeic words – to convey realism, a sense of presence, a re-enactment of the

original.

8. Vivid verbs – convey a sense of action.

9. Alliteration – helps bind phrases and thus thoughts together, lends completeness to passage. 10. Vivid imagery – takes reader away from the commonplace.

F. Punctuation

Often punctuation, or the lack of it, will help to define the author’s style.

1. Exclamation points – an abundance of these may help to establish an excited tone, a farcical

situation, or a satirical attitude.

2. Question marks – frequent use may mean the author wishes reader to reflect on what has

been written or to supply further information which would illuminate the subject.

3. Commas – slows the movement of the sentences, emphasis is on thought rather than action4. Semi-colons – these may signal balanced or parallel constructions.

5. Little or no internal punctuation – may suggest compactness or completeness of ideas.

General Comments on Style

1. Style helps to characterize the speaker.

2. Style creates tone, which can be used to facilitate a writer’s goals.

3. Style can convey an author’s attitude towards her material.

4. Style can be a means of persuasion.

5. Style results from choices; the more frequently these choices are exercised, that is, the more they stand out, the higher the probability that they express the writer’s unique style.

6. Style is not mere ornament; it conveys important subtleties of meaning and judgement,

especially as they define the goals and practices of the writer, her basic attitudes, pre suppositions, moral stance, and her relation to her subject and her reader. In trying to

analyze style, look for unusual or unique features in the writing.

Sources:

1. Hans P. Guth, Words and Ideas, Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1980.

2. Robert G. Perrin, Writer’s Guide and Index to English, Scott, Forseman & Co., 1959.

3. Kane, Peters, Jackel, Legris, Writing Prose, Oxford University Press, 1981. Source for Elements of Style:

Bow Valley College crib sheet on style

https://stormschoonover.weebly.com/uploads/9/4/3/6…Humanities 1VV3

Final Essay Assignment

Due Date: Week 12, Dec 4 – 7, in your Active Learning Classroom

Length: Four pages, double spaced, 1” margins, 12 pt font

Upload your essay into the Final Essay assignment folder. No hard copy required.

Write an essay on the style of your book. The criteria from the Elements of Style listed below will

be your main guide. Include in your discussion TWO criteria from the list, as follows

— The tone of the composition as a whole (A)

— One other element (B to F) of your choice.

Discuss how the second (stylistic element B-F) relates to the first (the tone of the composition). Usone other scholarly source or resource in your essay.

Elements of Style

A. The Tone of the Composition as a Whole (mandatory)

B. Paragraph Development

C. Sentence Structure

D. Sentence Rhythm

E. Diction

F. Punctuation

The Tone of the Composition as a Whole

This list represents an array of possible tones in a work. Choose one tone for your discussion. If

you don’t choose from this list, speak with your instructor about an alternative.

1. Flexible – the author is not bound by the conventions of writing; she is free to explore all

avenues.

2. Varied – the author chooses more than one kind of style to make her point – these may be used

for purposes of comparison or contrast or for purposes of emphasis.

3. Rigid, mannered – one style is maintained throughout the composition perhaps to convey a sense of completeness, or to restrict thought to that convention.

4. Conventional – adheres to the rules of general usage and conforms to established practices. 5. Traditional – customs are based on time-honoured practices.

6. Individual – has characteristics which relate to the personality of the author or one of her

characters.

7. Original – unprecedented practices created by the author.

8. Fresh – a new outlook on an established idea.

9. Tense – the overall tone of the passage is strained or suspenseful.

10. Relaxed – conveys an effortless atmosphere in a loose, less formal manner.

11. Simple – portrays characters or ideas candidly with few chances for misunderstanding.

12. Complex – the subject is many-faceted, with figures of speech, longer sentences, use of

analogies, etc.

13. Literal – communicates on one level, a primary meaning, concerned with facts; exaggerates or

embellishes very little.

14. Figurative – makes use of figures of speech, metaphorical, or literary devices.

15. Direct – straightforward, candid, frank, does not deviate.

16. Involved – takes an in-depth look at the subject, exploring feelings and behaviours at length;

patient and pain-staking in its developments.

17. Abstract – favours the theoretical over the concrete; deals in abstractions, concepts.

18. Concrete – relies heavily on specific facts and instances to flesh out ideas.

19. Ponderous – heavy and dull

20. Epigrammatic – containing wise sayings smartly expressed

21. Didactic – instructive (teaching)

22. Dogmatic – positive, assertive

23. Colloquial – using the vernacular (common speech)

24. Pompous – pretentious, affecting a false dignity

25. Gushing – without reserve, usually without reflection

26. Coy – a pretense of bashfulness 27. Ironical – the use of words to convey the opposite of their literal meaning

28. Humorous – funny, laughable, comical

29. Gay – merry, cheerful, jolly

30. Solemn – deeply earnest, serious, grave

31. Wistful – pensive, wishful

33. Romantic – extravagantly emotional, idealistic

34. Religious – conscientious devotion to topic

35. Serious – sober, earnest, sincere

36. Melancholy – thoughtfully sad

37. Sad – sorrowful, unhappy, dispirited

38. Whimsical – oddly funny

39. Reminiscent – things remembered

40. Sentimental – cloying or overdone in its emotions

41. Pensive – musing, thoughtful

42. Reverent – showing respect

43. Sportive – mischievous

44. Reflective – thoughtful

45. Somber – gloomy

46. Sinister – boding evil

47. Nostalgic – longing for home or country, or for something that is absent

Paragraph Development

The development of paragraphs within a composition is dependent on the author’s depiction of her

topic. Paragraphs may be developed:

1. Sequentially – organized by steps or through time

2. Spatially – organized through distance or space 3. Logically – reasoning from one supposition to another

4. Systematically – according to a method

5. Haphazardly – to convey a sense of confusion

C. Sentence Structure

Clues to an author’s style may rest in the structure of her sentences.

1. Short – giving a staccato effect for excitement or speed.

2. Long – characterizes formal styles, especially discussions of ideas, also common in fiction (i.e.,

descriptive passages).

3. Varied in length – figures of speech may be used in order to embellish ideas.

4. Loose – makes sense if brought to a close at one or more points before the end.

5. Periodic – makes complete sense only when one reaches the end (or period). This may add to

suspense or variety.

6. Parallel – two or more parts of a sentence follow the same grammatical construction. Use for

emphasis.

7. Balance, antithesis, inversion, repetition and subordinate construction adds emphasis to ideas

discussed in passage.

8. Simple and compound sentences lend simplistic tone and style, subject is not meant to be

portrayed in a complex manner

9. Complex sentences may help to convey a conflict of ideas.

10. Logical connectives between sentences solidify the argument.

11. Rhetorical questions – used to make the reader supply additional material for the passage, and to motivate reader to consider implications of passage.

D. Sentence Rhythm

An author’s style may be enhanced by the rhythm of her sentences. This rhythm can convey a sense of regularity or an evolving process; it may be achieved through length, repetition, symmetry,

parallelism; look for clues in punctuation.

E. Diction

Examine the words in the composition. They may be:

1. Monosyllabic – one syllable – this style may be used to effect simplicity or it may be used for the purposes of austerity.

2. Polysyllabic – two or more syllables – a more formal, serious style which may make use of

any of the constructions mentioned previously.

3. Archaic – belonging to ancient times – in this case, the style is obviously meant to transport

the reader into a different era.

4. Connotative – suggesting more than the plain meaning – a figurative style meant to be

emotive or reflective.

Other words to consider when analyzing the style based on a study of the words in a passage are: 1. Rare words – the intent may be lofty, lighthearted, informative or comparative.

2. Technical and scientific words – serious writing with a referential intent.

3. Slang and colloquialisms – may be used for humour or for realism.

4. Abstractions – intended to make reader reflect or accept alternate ideas.

5. Dialect words – used to portray a definite group of people, to convey realistic flavour.

6. Allusions – formal writing; the author supposes readers can make comparative judgements.

7. Onomatopoeic words – to convey realism, a sense of presence, a re-enactment of the

original.

8. Vivid verbs – convey a sense of action.

9. Alliteration – helps bind phrases and thus thoughts together, lends completeness to passage. 10. Vivid imagery – takes reader away from the commonplace.

F. Punctuation

Often punctuation, or the lack of it, will help to define the author’s style.

1. Exclamation points – an abundance of these may help to establish an excited tone, a farcical

situation, or a satirical attitude.

2. Question marks – frequent use may mean the author wishes reader to reflect on what has

been written or to supply further information which would illuminate the subject.

3. Commas – slows the movement of the sentences, emphasis is on thought rather than action4. Semi-colons – these may signal balanced or parallel constructions.

5. Little or no internal punctuation – may suggest compactness or completeness of ideas.

General Comments on Style

1. Style helps to characterize the speaker.

2. Style creates tone, which can be used to facilitate a writer’s goals.

3. Style can convey an author’s attitude towards her material.

4. Style can be a means of persuasion.

5. Style results from choices; the more frequently these choices are exercised, that is, the more they stand out, the higher the probability that they express the writer’s unique style.

6. Style is not mere ornament; it conveys important subtleties of meaning and judgement,

especially as they define the goals and practices of the writer, her basic attitudes, pre suppositions, moral stance, and her relation to her subject and her reader. In trying to

analyze style, look for unusual or unique features in the writing.

Sources:

1. Hans P. Guth, Words and Ideas, Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1980.

2. Robert G. Perrin, Writer’s Guide and Index to English, Scott, Forseman & Co., 1959.

3. Kane, Peters, Jackel, Legris, Writing Prose, Oxford University Press, 1981. Source for Elements of Style:

Bow Valley College crib sheet on style

https://stormschoonover.weebly.com/uploads/9/4/3/6…

 

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